3D Printed Homes Are Coming to Australia

Image courtesy of Fortex
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Have you heard of 3D printing? In brief, 3D printing uses computer-aided design to create three-dimensional objects through a layering method. Sometimes referred to as additive manufacturing, 3D printing involves layering materials, like plastics, composites or bio-materials to create objects that range in shape, size, rigidity and colour.

Now it seems that Australia’s construction industry is on the cusp of a 3D printing revolution. Melbourne-based company Fortex has entered into partnership with COBOD International to bring the world-leading BOD2 3D construction printing technology to Australian shores.

Fortex Chief Executive Officer David Lederer said COBOD 3D construction printers deliver faster, greener, more durable homes and commercial buildings, with greater design freedom than conventional building methods.

“Fortex is proud to be laying the foundation for a new construction paradigm in Australia with COBOD 3D printers.

“This world-leading technology is the disruptor conventional building needs. It is not only the future of construction, it is the now,” Mr Lederer said.

COBOD 3D construction printing will accelerate homebuilding timeframes, streamlining labour and alleviating supply issues at a time when skills and material shortages plague the conventional housing construction industry.

Under its partnership, Fortex will be the exclusive Australian distributor of COBOD International products including the BOD2 3D construction printer.

Danish-based COBOD is at the forefront of 3D construction printing globally, with projects across six continents. COBOD is headquartered in Denmark and count world leading companies like General Electric and PERI among their shareholders. COBOD has an Asia-Pacific regional office in Kuala Lumpur.

The 3D printer’s modular design is developed to fit most projects, using innovative technology to control the extrusion of concrete in accordance with the programmed build design. The fully automated process is predominantly conducted onsite.

While single and multiple storey domestic projects will be the prime application, concrete and mortar 3D prints outside of home construction are also possible with wind turbine towers already having been printed by the COBOD BOD2.

The first BOD2 3D Construction printer will arrive in Australia shortly with COBOD equipment available for immediate order.

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